Is abnormal limb bud morphology in the mutant Talpid2 chick embryo a result of altered intercellular adhesion? Studies employing cell sorting and fragment fusion

Richard Niederman, Peter B. Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the past, studies of avian limb morphogenesis emphasized epithelial‐mesenchymal tissue interactions and problems of determination of limb symmetry. In contrast, a recent hypothesis, based on studies of the aggregation rates of dissociated cells and on computer modeling, proposes that the paddle shaped polydactylous limb of the talpid3 mutant is the result of increased intercellular adhesion of limb bud mesoderm cells during limb development. The notion that differences in intercellular adhesion may have profound effects on limb morphogenesis has not been critically explored previously. The present experimental approach includes studies of cell sorting in aggregates containing both talpid2 and wild‐type cells. In this system, adhesive differences should result in cell sorting. Instead, cell sorting did not occur, indicating by this test at least, that limb bud mesoderm cells of talpid2 and wild‐type embryos are equally adhesive. This conclusion finds support from studies involving tissue spreading in fused fragments of talpid2 and wild‐type limb bud mesenchyme tissue and in studies of kinetics of aggregation of dissociated cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-32
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Experimental Zoology
Volume181
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1972

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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