Is major depression comorbid with temporomandibular pain and dysfunction syndrome? A pilot study

R. M. Gallagher, J. J. Marbach, K. G. Raphael, B. P. Dohrenwend, M. Cloitre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is a lack of information about the precise strength of the relationship between chronic pain and depression. In a prior study, women with temporomandibular pain and dysfunction syndrome (TMPDS) had much higher scores than did controls on a measure of nonspecific psychological distress. The question arose as to whether rates of clinical depression are also unusually high in TMPDS patients. Their former treating clinician rated cases for likely lifetime presence or absence of depression. A subset of those rated as likely depressed then had their diagnoses verified independently through a structured clinical interview by a psychiatrist and clinical psychologist. Results revealed a minimum lifetime prevalence rate for major depression of 41%. A rate of this magnitude in TMPDS cases is clearly much higher than would be found for women of similar background in the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-225
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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