‘It Just Makes Sense to Me’: A qualitative study exploring patient decision-making and experiences with prostate MRI during active surveillance for prostate cancer

Ryan Sutherland, Cary P. Gross, Xiaomei Ma, Farah Jeong, Tyler M. Seibert, Matthew R. Cooperberg, William J. Catalona, Shellie D. Ellis, Stacy Loeb, Dena Schulman-Green, Michael S. Leapman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Although prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used in the diagnosis, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer, little is known about patient perspectives on MRI. Methods: We performed a qualitative study consisting of in-depth, semi-structured interviews of patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer managed with active surveillance. Interviews focused on experiences with and knowledge of prostate MRI and MRI-ultrasound fusion biopsy during active surveillance. We purposively sampled patients who received prostate MRI as part of their clinical care, conducted interviews until reaching thematic saturation and performed conventional content analysis to analyse data. Results: Twenty patients aged 51–79 years (mean = 68 years) participated in the study. At diagnosis, 17 (85%) had a Gleason grade group 1, and three (15%) had a grade group 2 tumour. Overall, participants viewed prostate MRI as a valuable tool that accurately localizes and monitors prostate cancer over time, and they considered prostate MRI central to active surveillance monitoring. We identified five thematic categories related to MRI use: (1) the experiential aspects of undergoing an MRI scan; (2) the experience of visualizing one's own prostate and prostate cancer; (3) adequacy of provider explanations of MRI results; (4) confidence in prostate MRI in decision-making; and (5) the role of prostate MRI in longitudinal follow-up, including an interest in using MRI to modify the timing of, or replace, prostate biopsy. Conclusion: Patients value prostate MRI as a tool that enhances their confidence in the initial diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer. This work can inform future studies to optimize patient experience, education and counselling during active surveillance for prostate cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBJUI Compass
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • active surveillance
  • patient-centered research
  • prostate MRI
  • prostate cancer
  • qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology
  • Oncology
  • Surgery
  • Nephrology

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