"It's time for your life": How should we remind patients to take medicines using short text messages?

Walter H. Curioso, D. Alex Quistberg, Robinson Cabello, Ernesto Gozzer, Patricia J. Garcia, King K. Holmes, Ann E. Kurth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to characterize effective patient care reminder strategies for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence) using short message service (SMS) based on patient perspectives. We conducted a qualitative study with adult PLWHA in a community-based clinic in Lima, Peru using focus groups. 26 HIV-positive individuals participated in four focus groups (20 men, 6 women). The participants expressed positive perceptions towards receiving reminders via SMS, but specified certain characteristics they wanted them to have (such as being simple and concise). It was also important that the messages maintained confidentiality and privacy by using coded words or phrases ("Remember, it is the time of your life") instead of "sensitive" words (HIV or antiretroviral). This study suggests that patients want healthcare SMS that appropriately notify them, deliver a careful crafted message, and assess the context in which they are received.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-133
Number of pages5
JournalAMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium
Volume2009
StatePublished - 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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  • Cite this

    Curioso, W. H., Quistberg, D. A., Cabello, R., Gozzer, E., Garcia, P. J., Holmes, K. K., & Kurth, A. E. (2009). "It's time for your life": How should we remind patients to take medicines using short text messages? AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium, 2009, 129-133.