Knowledge about and behaviors affecting the spread of AIDS: A Street survey of intravenous drug users and their associates in new york city

Paula H. Kleinman, Douglas S. Goldsmith, Samuel R. Friedman, William Hopkins, Don C. Des Jarlais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An informal survey of knowledge about and behaviors relevant to the spread of AIDS was conducted on the street in New York City during October 1986. The sample (n = 204) includes IV drug users (60% and others (40% The informal nature of the interview suggests that respondents gave "salient" answers rather than the complete answers that would be expected in a formal interview situation. A smaller proportion of respondents reported salient knowledge about drug-related transmission of AIDS than had been found in other populations, using formal interview methods. A close association was found between any accurate knowledge about spread of AIDS and likelihood of practicing one or more risk reduction behaviors. New users (persons who had been using drugs for only 1 or 2 years) were significantly less likely than others to have salient knowledge about AIDS transmission and also less likely to practice risk reduction measures

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-361
Number of pages17
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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