Lack of community insurance and mammography screening rates among insured and uninsured women

José A. Pagán, David A. Asch, Cynthia J. Brown, Carmen E. Guerra, Katrina Armstrong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate whether the proportion of the local population without health insurance coverage is related to whether women undergo mammography screening. Methods: Survey data on 12,595 women 40 to 69 years of age from the 2000 to 2001 Community Tracking Study Household Survey were used to analyze the relation between community lack of insurance and whether the respondent had a mammogram within the past year. Results: Women age 40 to 69 were less likely to report that they had a mammogram within the last year if they resided in communities with a relatively high uninsurance rate, even after adjusting for other factors. After adjusting for individual insurance and other factors, a 10-percentage-point decrease in the proportion of the local insured population is associated with a 17% (95% CI, 13% to 21%) decrease in the odds that a woman age 40 to 69 years will undergo mammography screening within a year. Conclusion: Women living in communities with high uninsurance are substantially less likely to undergo mammography screening. These results are consistent with the view that the negative impact of uninsurance extends to everyone in the community regardless of individual health insurance status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1865-1870
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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