Masculinity, condom use self-efficacy and abusive responses to condom negotiation: The case for HIV prevention for heterosexual African-American men

Jerris L. Raiford, Puja Seth, Nikia D. Braxton, Ralph J. Diclemente

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background This study explored the role of masculinity and perceived condom use skills in African-American men's abusive response to female partners' condom requests. Methods: Eighty African-American men aged 18-29 years completed measures on sexual behaviour, responses to condom requests, condom use self-efficacy and other masculine constructs. Men also were tested for sexually transmissible infections. Results: Men's condom use self-efficacy explained 16.5% of the variance in abusive response to condom requests, beyond demographics and masculine constructs. The full model accounted for 63% of the variance. Conclusions: Many HIV interventions with women encourage condom negotiation. Findings highlight the need to address men's condom use skills and masculine norms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)467-469
Number of pages3
JournalSexual Health
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • partner violence
  • safer sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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