Maternal sensitivity during the first 31/2 years of life predicts electrophysiological responding to and cognitive appraisals of infant crying at midlife

Jodi Martin, Jacob E. Anderson, Ashley M. Groh, Theodore E.A. Waters, Ethan Young, William F. Johnson, Jessica L. Shankman, Jami Eller, Cory Fleck, Ryan D. Steele, Elizabeth A. Carlson, Jeffry A. Simpson, Glenn I. Roisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the predictive significance of maternal sensitivity in early childhood for electrophysiological responding to and cognitive appraisals of infant crying at midlife in a sample of 73 adults (age = 39 years; 43 females; 58 parents) from the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaptation. When listening to an infant crying, both parents and nonparents who had experienced higher levels of maternal sensitivity in early childhood (between 3 and 42 months of age) exhibited larger changes from rest toward greater relative left (vs. right) frontal EEG activation, reflecting an approach-oriented response to distress. Parents who had experienced greater maternal sensitivity in early childhood also made fewer negative causal attributions about the infant's crying; the association between sensitivity and attributions for infant crying was nonsignificant for nonparents. The current findings demonstrate that experiencing maternal sensitivity during the first 31/2 years of life has long-term predictive significance for adults' processing of infant distress signals more than three decades later.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1917-1927
Number of pages11
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume54
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Childhood development
  • Cognitive appraisal
  • Electrophysiology
  • Infant distress
  • Parental sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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    Martin, J., Anderson, J. E., Groh, A. M., Waters, T. E. A., Young, E., Johnson, W. F., Shankman, J. L., Eller, J., Fleck, C., Steele, R. D., Carlson, E. A., Simpson, J. A., & Roisman, G. I. (2018). Maternal sensitivity during the first 31/2 years of life predicts electrophysiological responding to and cognitive appraisals of infant crying at midlife. Developmental psychology, 54(10), 1917-1927. https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0000579