Mechanical force redistribution: Enabling seamless, large-format, high-accuracy surface interaction

Alex Grau, Charles Hendee, John Ross Rizzo, Ken Perlin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We present Mechanical Force Redistribution (MFR): A method of sensing which creates an anti-aliased image of forces applied to a surface. This technique mechanically focuses the force from a surface onto adjacent discrete forcels (force sensing cells) by way of protrusions (small bumps or pegs), allowing for high-accuracy interpolation between adjacent discrete forcels. MFR works with any force transducing technique or material, including force variable resistive inks, piezoelectric materials and capacitive force plates. MFR sensors can be tiled such that the signal is continuous across contiguous tiles. By minimizing active materials and computational complexity, MFR makes large-format interactive walls, collaborative tabletops and high-resolution floor tiles possible and economically feasible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2014
Subtitle of host publicationOne of a CHInd - Conference Proceedings, 32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages4137-4146
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9781450324731
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2014 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: Apr 26 2014May 1 2014

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

Other32nd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2014
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period4/26/145/1/14

Keywords

  • Floors
  • Force
  • Input Device
  • Large Format
  • Mechanical Force Redistribution
  • Medical
  • Pressure
  • Sensor
  • Tabletop

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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