Mechanisms of light scattering from biological cells relevant to noninvasive optical-tissue diagnostics

Judith R. Mourant, James P. Freyer, Andreas H. Hielscher, Angelia A. Eick, Dan Shen, Tamara M. Johnson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    We have studied the optical properties of mammalian cell suspensions to provide a mechanistic basis for interpreting the optical properties of tissues in vivo. Measurements of the wavelength dependence of the reduced scattering coefficient and measurements of the phase function demonstrated that there is a distribution of scatterer sizes. The volumes of the scatterers are equivalent to those of spheres with diameters in the range between ȼ0.4 and 2.0 μm. Measurements of isolated organelles indicate that mitochondria and other similarly sized organelles are responsible for scattering at large angles, whereas nuclei are responsible for small-angle scattering. Therefore optical diagnostics are expected to be sensitive to organelle morphology but not directly to the size and shape of the cells.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)3586-3593
    Number of pages8
    JournalApplied Optics
    Volume37
    Issue number16
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 1 1998

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
    • Engineering (miscellaneous)
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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