Metabolic syndrome among New York City (NYC) adults: change in prevalence from 2004 to 2013–2014 using New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Rania Kanchi, Sharon E. Perlman, Bahman Tabaei, Mark D. Schwartz, Nadia Islam, Claudia Chernov, Adeiyewunmi Osinubi, Lorna E. Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: In this study we aim to estimate the change in metabolic syndrome (MetS) prevalence among New York City (NYC) adults between 2004 and 2013–2014 and identify key subgroups at risk. Methods: We analyzed data from NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. MetS was defined as having at least three of the following: abdominal obesity, low HDL, elevated triglycerides, glucose dysregulation, and elevated blood pressure. We calculated age-standardized MetS prevalence, change in prevalence over time, and prevalence ratios by gender and race/ethnicity groups. We also tested for additive interaction. Results: In 2013–2014 MetS prevalence among NYC adults was 24.4% (95% CI, 21.4–27.6). Adults 65+ years and Asian adults had the highest prevalence (45.6% and 33.8%, respectively). Abdominal obesity was the most prevalent MetS component in 2004 and 2013–2014 (50.7% each time). Between 2004 and 2013–2014, MetS decreased by 18.2% (P = .04) among women. The decrease paralleled similar declines in elevated triglycerides and glucose dysregulation. In 2013–14, non-Latino Black women had higher risk of MetS than non-Latino Black men and non-Latino White adults. Conclusion: Age and racial/ethnic disparities in MetS prevalence in NYC were persistent from 2004 to 2013–2014, with Asian adults and non-Latino Black women at particularly high risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-63
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume58
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Gender disparities
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • NYC HANES
  • Obesity
  • Race disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

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