Metacognition, risk behavior, and risk outcomes: The role of perceived intelligence and perceived knowledge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present study explores 2 key variables in social metacognition: perceived intelligence and perceived levels of knowledge about a specific content domain. The former represents a judgment of one's knowledge at an abstract level, whereas the latter represents a judgment of one's knowledge in a specific content domain. Data from interviews of approximately 8,411 female adolescents from a national sample were analyzed in a 2-wave panel design with a year between assessments. Higher levels of perceived intelligence at Wave 1 were associated with a lower probability of the occurrence of a pregnancy over the ensuing year independent of actual IQ, self-esteem, and academic aspirations. Higher levels of perceived knowledge about the accurate use of birth control were associated with a higher probability of the occurrence of a pregnancy independent of actual knowledge about accurate use, perceived intelligence, self-esteem, and academic aspirations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • IQ
  • Intelligence
  • Risk behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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