Microanalytic case studies of individual participation patterns in an asynchronous online discussion in an undergraduate blended course

Alyssa Friend Wise, Nishan Perera, Ying Ting Hsiao, Jennifer Speer, Farshid Marbouti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study presents three case studies of students' participation patterns in an online discussion to address the gap in our current understanding of how individuals experience asynchronous learning environments. Cases were constructed via microanalysis of log-file data, post contents, and the evolving discussion structure. The first student was Thorough, reading all the posts in the forum in sequence, revisiting different posts multiple times, and creating posts outside of the discussion tool. The second student was Self-Monitoring, revisiting his own posts multiple times, checking the discussion frequently for replies, and replying to or editing his posts in response. Finally, the third student was Independent, using the forum as a tool for her own individual reflection. The behaviors found for these cases are aligned with a theoretical taxonomy for participation proposed by Knowlton (2005). The value and limitations of the microanalytic case study approach are discussed, and implications for research and practice are suggested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-117
Number of pages10
JournalInternet and Higher Education
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Asynchronous discussion groups
  • Computer mediated communication
  • Learning strategies
  • Mixed methods
  • Online learning
  • Student participation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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