Moderator effects of cognitive ability and social support on the relation between race-related stress and quality of life in a community sample of Black Americans

Shawn O. Utsey, Yzette Lanier, Otis Williams, Mark Bolden, Angela Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The current study examined the combined moderating effects of cognitive ability and social support on the relation between race-related stress and quality of life in a sample of Black Americans. Participants (N = 323) were administered the Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT; E. F. Wonderlic Associates, Inc., 1983), the Multidimensional Social Support Scale (MDSS; Winefield, Winefield, & Tiggemann, 1992), the Index of Race-Related Stress-Brief (Utsey, 1999), and the WHOQOL-BREF (The WHO Group, 1998). The findings indicated that cognitive ability and social support, conjointly, moderated the relation between individual and cultural race-related stress and quality of life for Black Americans in the current sample. The paper concludes by discussing the study's findings, limitations, and by offering recommendations for future research related to this area of inquiry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-346
Number of pages13
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Cognitive ability
  • Racism
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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