National assessment of recommendations from healthcare providers for smoking cessation among adults with cancer

Richard S. Matulewicz, Zachary Feuer, Sarah A. Birken, Danil V. Makarov, Scott E. Sherman, Marc A. Bjurlin, Omar El Shahawy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cancer survivors benefit from evidence-based smoking cessation treatment. A crucial first step in this process is a clinician recommending that the patient quit smoking. However, contemporary delivery of advice to quit among patients with cancer is not well known. In a cross-sectional analysis of all adult smokers included in a prospective population-representative study of US adults, we analyzed the frequency that patients reported receiving advice to quit smoking from a healthcare professional according to reported cancer history (no cancer, tobacco-related cancer, non-tobacco related cancer history). Among an estimated 28.3 million smokers, 9.3% reported a history of cancer, 48.8% of which were tobacco-related cancers. In general, advice to quit was reported by more (67.8%) cancer survivors than those adults without any cancer (56.0%). After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, smokers with a non tobacco-related cancer (0.51, 95% CI 0.32–0.83) and those without any cancer history (0.43, 95% CI 0.30–0.63) were both less likely to report being advised to quit smoking than patients with a tobacco-related cancer history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102088
JournalCancer Epidemiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

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