Neuronal lineages in chimeric mouse forebrain are segregated between compartments and in the rostrocaudal and radial planes

Gord Fishell, Janet Rossant, Derek van der Kooy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

On the basis of neuronal phenotypes and the mode of development of the mammalian forebrain, the cerebral cortex can be subdivided into deep versus superficial layers, and the striatum into patch versus matrix compartments. Interspecific chimeric Mus musculus↔Mus caroli mice were used to determine the contribution of lineage to cellular position within these forebrain compartments. Statistical analysis revealed evidence of both spatial and compartmental lineage segregation. A significant difference in genotype ratio depending on chimeric specimen was observed between areas (regardless of compartment) that were separated by greater than 300 μm in the rostrocaudal plane. Differences were observed between early-born (striatal patch and deep cortex) versus late-born (striatal matrix and superficial cortex) neurons, but not between neurons of cortex as a whole versus neurons of striatum as a whole. The difference between early- and late-born neurons was primarily due to the difference between deep and superficial cortical neurons. On a finer scale of analysis, differences in genotype ratios were seen between radially aligned deep versus superficial cortical compartments, in both the neuronal and glial populations. This evidence is consistent with an early positional and compartmental segregation of forebrain progenitor cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-83
Number of pages14
JournalDevelopmental Biology
Volume141
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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