Oral maxillary squamous carcinoma: An indication for neck dissection in the clinically negative neck

David M. Montes, Eric R. Carlson, Rui Fernandes, G. E. Ghali, Joshua Lubek, Robert Ord, Bryan Bell, Eric Dierks, Brian L. Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background This multicenter study was undertaken to characterize the metastatic behavior of oral maxillary squamous carcinoma and to determine the role of selective neck dissection. Methods A retrospective, multicenter study of patients surgically treated for oral maxillary squamous carcinoma was completed. Data collected included primary tumor location, cervical lymph node status, and neck failure rate. Results The study included 146 patients. The adjusted regional metastatic rate was 31.4%. Of those N0 (clinically negative) necks treated with or without neck dissection, 14.4% developed cervical metastasis. Within the cohort, 7.5% of patients died with distant disease. The regional salvage rate was 52.9%. None of the patients with locoregional failures were salvaged. Conclusions Maxillary palatal, alveolar, and gingival squamous carcinomas exhibit aggressive regional metastatic behavior. Surgical salvage rates for neck failure are low; therefore, selective neck dissection (levels I-III) is recommended at the time of resection of T2, T3, and T4 maxillary squamous carcinomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1581-1585
Number of pages5
JournalHead and Neck
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • cervical metastasis
  • maxillary
  • neck dissection
  • oral cancer
  • squamous cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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