Paid maternal leave is associated with better language and socioemotional outcomes during toddlerhood

Karina Kozak, Ashley Greaves, Jane Waldfogel, Jyoti Angal, Amy J. Elliott, William P. Fifier, Natalie Hiromi Brito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The United States is the only high-income country that does not have a national policy mandating paid leave to working women who give birth. Increased rates of maternal employment post-birth call for greater understanding of the effects of family leave on infant development. This study examined the links between paid leave and toddler language, cognitive, and socioemotional outcomes (24–36 months; N = 328). Results indicate that paid leave was associated with better language outcomes, regardless of socioeconomic status. Additionally, paid leave was correlated with fewer infant behavior problems for mothers with lower levels of educational attainment. Expanding access to policies that support families in need, like paid family leave, may aid in reducing socioeconomic disparities in infant development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInfancy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Paid maternal leave is associated with better language and socioemotional outcomes during toddlerhood'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this