Parent–Child Relationships and Aging Parents’ Sleep Quality: A Comparison of One-Child and Multiple-Children Families in China

Haowei Wang, Kyungmin Kim, Jeffrey A. Burr, Bei Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This study examined the associations between parent–child relationships and sleep difficulty among older parents in the context of Chinese multiple-children and one-child families. Methods: Using the 2014 China Longitudinal Aging Social Survey, this study analyzed older parents’ (N = 8,450) reports of sleep quality and relationships with each of children. Results: Results from multivariate logistic regression models showed that living alone, greater variations in children’s financial transfers and emotional closeness, and more instrumental support from children were associated with higher risks of sleep difficulty for Chinese older parents with multiple children. The maximum levels of financial transfers and emotional closeness from all children were related to lower risks of sleep difficulty for parents from multiple-children families, while greater instrumental support from children was associated with higher risks of sleep difficulty for parents from one-child families. Discussion: Findings have implications for support programs for Chinese aging population with sleep problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • aging families
  • family structure
  • intergenerational relationships
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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