Perceptions, preferences, and experiences of tuberculosis education and counselling among patients and providers in Kampala, Uganda: A qualitative study

Irene Ayakaka, Mari Armstrong-Hough, Alisse Hannaford, Joseph M. Ggita, Patricia Turimumahoro, Achilles Katamba, Anne Katahoire, Adithya Cattamanchi, Sheela V. Shenoi, J. Lucian Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) education seeks to increase patient knowledge about TB, while TB counselling seeks to offer tailored advice and support for medication adherence. While universally recommended, little is known about how to provide effective, efficient, patient-centred TB education and counselling (TEC) in low-income, high HIV-TB burden settings. We sought to characterise stakeholder perceptions of TEC in a public, primary care facility in Kampala, Uganda, by conducting focus group discussions with health workers and TB patients in the TB and HIV clinics. Participants valued TEC but reported that high-quality TEC is rarely provided, because of a lack of time, space, staff, planning, and prioritisation given to TEC. To improve TEC, they recommended adopting practices that have proven effective in the HIV clinic, including better specifying educational content, and employing peer educators focused on TEC. Patients and health workers suggested that TEC should not only improve TB patient knowledge and adherence, but should also empower and assist all those undergoing evaluation for TB, whether confirmed or not, to educate their households and communities about TB. Community-engaged research with patients and front-line providers identified opportunities to streamline and standardise the delivery of TEC using a patient-centred, peer-educator model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages18
JournalGlobal Public Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • counselling
  • HIV
  • implementation science
  • patient education
  • patient preferences
  • Patient-centred
  • peer education
  • peer navigation
  • sub-Saharan Africa
  • tuberculosis
  • Uganda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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