Physician and dentist tobacco use counseling and adolescent smoking behavior: Results from the 2000 National Youth Tobacco Survey

Donna Shelley, Jennifer Cantrell, Dorothy Faulkner, Lyndon Haviland, Cheryl Healton, Peter Messeri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. The present study describes patterns of tobacco use counseling among physicians and dentists as reported by adolescents and determines the association between provider advice to quit and cessation activities among current smokers. Methods. Data were analyzed from the 2000 National Youth Tobacco Survey, an anonymous, self-administered, school-based survey. The National Youth Tobacco Survey was administered to a nationally representative sample of 35 828 students in grades 6 to 12 in 324 schools. Results. Thirty-three percent of adolescents who visited a physician or a dentist in the past year reported that a physician counseled them about the dangers of tobacco use, and 20% reported that a dentist provided a similar message. Among students who smoked in the past year, 16.4% received advice to quit from a physician and 11.6% received advice to quit from a dentist. Physician or dentist advice to quit was correlated with 1 or more quit attempts in the past 12 months. Conclusion. On the basis of adolescent reports, physician and dentist practice patterns remain well below recommended guidelines. Results suggest that provider advice to quit is associated with cessation activity. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether the low prevalence of brief provider tobacco use counseling is a missed opportunity to affect adolescent smoking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-725
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics
Volume115
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

Keywords

  • Physician practice patterns
  • Tobacco use/smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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