Policy Research Challenges in Comparing Care Models for Dual-Eligible Beneficiaries

Janet H. Van Cleave, Brian L. Egleston, Sarah Brosch, Elizabeth Wirth, Molly Lawson, Eileen M. Sullivan-Marx, Mary D. Naylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Providing affordable, high-quality care for the 10 million persons who are dual-eligible beneficiaries of Medicare and Medicaid is an ongoing health-care policy challenge in the United States. However, the workforce and the care provided to dual-eligible beneficiaries are understudied. The purpose of this article is to provide a narrative of the challenges and lessons learned from an exploratory study in the use of clinical and administrative data to compare the workforce of two care models that deliver home- and community-based services to dual-eligible beneficiaries. The research challenges that the study team encountered were as follows: (a) comparing different care models, (b) standardizing data across care models, and (c) comparing patterns of health-care utilization. The methods used to meet these challenges included expert opinion to classify data and summative content analysis to compare and count data. Using descriptive statistics, a summary comparison of the two care models suggested that the coordinated care model workforce provided significantly greater hours of care per recipient than the integrated care model workforce. This likely represented the coordinated care model's focus on providing in-home services for one recipient, whereas the integrated care model focused on providing services in a day center with group activities. The lesson learned from this exploratory study is the need for standardized quality measures across home- and community-based services agencies to determine the workforce that best meets the needs of dual-eligible beneficiaries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-83
Number of pages12
JournalPolicy, Politics, and Nursing Practice
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Keywords

  • Medicaid
  • Medicare
  • care coordination
  • dual-eligible beneficiaries
  • nursing workforce
  • outcomes (measurement)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects

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