Population-Level Assessment of Smoking-Related Beliefs and Behaviors Among Survivors of Genitourinary Cancers: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

Lee Brake, Akya Myrie, Calvin Zhao, Zach Feuer, Jacob Taylor, Marc A. Bjurlin, Scott E. Sherman, Danil V. Makarov, Richard S. Matulewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To describe attitudes, perceptions, and beliefs related to smoking and smoking cessation among survivors of genitourinary cancers using a theory-based framework. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of Wave III of the PATH study, a prospective cohort survey study assessing tobacco-use patterns and attitudes among a representative population-based sample of US adults. All adult current smokers with a history of urologic cancer were included. Primary outcomes were mapped to components of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and included: attempts to quit, readiness to quit, plan to quit, being told to quit, peers views toward smoking, regret about smoking, the perceived relationship between smoking and cancer/overall health. Secondary outcomes include: time to first cigarette, utilization of smoking cessation aids. Population weighted percentages with 95% confidence intervals were estimated. Results: Our cohort represents a population estimate of 461,182 adult current smokers with a history of genitourinary cancer. The majority of respondents (90%) perceived smoking to be harmful to one's health and 83% were regretful about having started smoking. An equal proportion of respondents indicated that they were “very ready to quit,” “somewhat ready to quit,” or “not ready to quit.” Among all respondents, 73% had been told by a physician to quit in the past year but only 7% indicated that they had used prescription medication and only 21% had used nicotine replacement therapy to help with smoking cessation. Conclusion: There is significant variation in attitudes, behaviors, and perceptions related to smoking and smoking cessation among survivors of genitourinary malignancy. Patient-level smoking cessation interventions may need to be highly personalized for optimal success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUrology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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