Predicting energy consumption in humans using joint space methods

Dustyn P. Roberts, Joo H. Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Humans act as transducers that transform chemical energy from food, water, and air into mechanical work and the thermal energy of heat loss. Although this energy expenditure can be experimentally measured, methods of predicting energy expenditure have not been broadly studied. This work introduces a new formulation of metabolic energy consumption based on muscle physiology and the equations of motion for the human body. Kinematic and kinetic data from a gait experiment and an over-Arm throwing simulation are used to illustrate and validate this new model. The results extend the capabilities of dynamic human modeling to include metabolic energy prediction in general tasks. This novel formulation is useful for the investigation of human performance with applications in physical therapy, rehabilitation, and sports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2012 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2012
Pages673-679
Number of pages7
EditionPARTS A AND B
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
EventASME 2012 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2012 - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Aug 12 2012Aug 12 2012

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
NumberPARTS A AND B
Volume3

Other

OtherASME 2012 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2012
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period8/12/128/12/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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