Predicting increases in readiness to quit smoking: A prospective analysis using the contemplation ladder

Thaddeus A. Herzog, David B. Abrams, Karen M. Emmons, Laura Linnan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Most smokers are not motivated to quit. The transtheoretical model posits mechanisms (processes of change and pros and cons) by which smokers might increase their stage of readiness to quit. While cross-sectional relationships among the stages of change, processes of change, and pros and cons are well established, there is little evidence that processes of change and pros and cons predict progressive stage movements. This study uses data from a large worksite-based cancer prevention study (the Working Well Trial) to test the hypothesis that processes of change and the pros and cons of smoking predict progressive movement up the contemplation ladder, which is an alternative measure of motivation to quit smoking based on social cognitive theory. The results indicate that experiential processes of change promote increases in readiness to quit smoking. This study provides further evidence for the predictive validity of the contemplation ladder and sheds light on how unmotivated, nonvolunteer smokers can be motivated to consider cessation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-381
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Motivation
  • Smoking cessation
  • Social-cognitive theory
  • Transtheoretical model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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