Predictors of Counseling Participation Among Low-Income People Offered an Integrated Intervention Targeting Financial Distress and Tobacco Use

Jacob Tempchin, Elizabeth Vargas, Scott Sherman, Erin Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Although prevalence of smoking in the USA has been decreasing for decades, smoking rates among low-income individuals remain elevated. Theories from behavioral economics and prior research suggest that financial stress may contribute to the difficulty that low-income smokers face in quitting. The present work is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial that incorporated financial coaching and social services referrals into smoking cessation treatment. Primary analyses showed that participants randomized to the intervention (N = 208) were significantly more likely not to smoke, to have lower financial stress, and to be able to afford leisure activities (p <.05) than were control participants (N = 202). Methods: This paper investigates subgroup discrepancies in attendance of intervention sessions and in uptake of various components of this intervention through exploratory analysis. Results: Analysis using logistic regression indicated that decreased age, not having received higher education, and having income less than $1000 per month were predictive of decreased counseling attendance (p <.05). Few demographic factors were predictive of uptake of counseling components among those who attended counseling. Conclusions: These results can guide future efforts to increase participant engagement in the intervention. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03187730.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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