Preferences for return of incidental findings from genome sequencing among women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age

K. A. Kaphingst, J. Ivanovich, B. B. Biesecker, R. Dresser, J. Seo, L. G. Dressler, P. J. Goodfellow, M. S. Goodman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While experts have made recommendations, information is needed regarding what genome sequencing results patients would want returned. We investigated what results women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age would want returned and why. We conducted 60 semi-structured, in-person individual interviews with women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 40 or younger. We examined interest in six types of incidental findings and reasons for interest or disinterest in each type. Two coders independently coded interview transcripts; analysis was conducted using NVivo 10. Most participants were at least somewhat interested in all six result types, but strongest interest was in actionable results (i.e. variants affecting risk of a preventable or treatable disease and treatment response). Reasons for interest varied between different result types. Some participants were not interested or ambivalent about results not seen as currently actionable. Participants wanted to be able to choose what results are returned. Participants distinguished between types of individual genome sequencing results, with different reasons for wanting different types of information. The findings suggest that a focus on actionable results can be a common ground for all stakeholders in developing a policy for returning individual genome sequencing results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-384
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Genetics
Volume89
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Genome sequencing
  • Incidental findings
  • Patient preferences
  • Return of results

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Preferences for return of incidental findings from genome sequencing among women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this