Prenatal cocaine delays astroglial maturation: Immunodensitometry shows increased markers of immaturity (vimentin and GAP-43) and decreased proliferation and production of the growth factor S-100

Colin Clarke, Kara Clarke, Jennifer Muneyyirci, Efrain Azmitia, Patricia M. Whitaker-Azmitia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Exposure to cocaine during fetal development has been demonstrated to produce a variety of brain and behavioral changes. Cocaine is a potent releaser of a variety of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, which act as developmental signals. Since serotonin plays an important role in astroglial maturation, migration, and growth factor production (e.g. S-100β), we proposed that these properties of astroglial cells will be altered in a brain prenatally exposed to cocaine. To observe cocaine's effects on astroglial development, we performed immunocytochemical analyses of a variety of developmental protein markers including BrdU, Gap-43, vimentin, and S100β. Our results demonstrate that prenatal cocaine administration produces decreased cell proliferation as measured by BrdU staining, retarded neurite outgrowth as ascertained by increased Gap-43 immunoreactivity, increased density of vimentin-positive radial glial cells, and diminished tissue S100β immunoreactivity. Overall, these results suggest that cocaine delays astroglial development. This delay would have profound effects on neuronal development and outgrowth and, thus, development of the entire brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-273
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Brain Research
Volume91
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 1996

Keywords

  • BrdU
  • Cocaine
  • GAP-43
  • Gliogenesis
  • Prenatal
  • S-100
  • Vimentin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Biology

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