Preschoolers' use of suppression influences subsequent self-control but does not interfere with verbal memory

Catherine Gunzenhauser, Antje von Suchodoletz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined cognitive consequences of preschoolers' suppression of emotional responses. We investigated two research questions that specify potentially unfavorable cognitive consequences of suppression use: depletion of self-control resources and decreased memory of verbal information. Children (N=. 119) were assigned to suppression and control conditions and received standardized emotion regulation instructions before watching an emotionally arousing film clip. Findings suggest that children who have used suppression experience depletion of self-control resources but do not suffer from impairments in verbal memory. This study confirms the importance of creating a preschool environment where children are supported in appropriate emotional displays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-224
Number of pages6
JournalLearning and Individual Differences
Volume32
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • Ego-depletion
  • Emotion regulation strategies
  • Self-control
  • Suppression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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