Prevalence and predictors of obesity-related counseling provided by outpatient psychiatrists in the United States

Erin S. Rogers, Scott E. Sherman, Dolores Malaspina, Melanie Jay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study sought to identify rates and predictors of obesity counseling performed by outpatient psychiatrists in the United States. Methods: The 2005-2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys provided data from 7,309 outpatient psychiatry visits. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between patient, visit, and practice characteristics and outcomes. Results: Most (81%) visits occurred in a private practice setting. Nine percent (N=657) of visits included measurement of patient body mass index (BMI); 30% of these visits were with patients who met the obesity criterion (BMI ≥30.0 kg/m2). Among visits with obese patients, 16% included exercise counseling, 22% included weight reduction counseling, and 24% included diet or nutrition counseling. Patients with obesity were more likely than patients without obesity to receive diet or nutrition counseling (p<.05) and weight reduction counseling (p<.05), but not exercise counseling. Black patients were significantly less likely to receive any form of counseling (p<.05). Conclusions: There is a significant need to improve psychiatrists' obesity counseling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1156-1159
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatric Services
Volume67
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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