Preventive intervention for urban, low-income preschoolers at familial risk for conduct problems: A randomized pilot study

Laurie Miller Brotman, Rachel G. Klein, Dimitra Kamboukos, Elissa J. Brown, Stephanie Irby Coard, Laura Stout Sosinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Conducted a pilot study to test the feasibility of a prevention program for promoting parenting in families of preschoolers at high risk for behavior problems. Risk status was based on a family history of antisocial behavior and residence in a low-income, urban community. Thirty preschoolers (ages 2 1/2 to 5) and their parents were randomly assigned to a 1-year, home- and clinic-based intervention or to a no-intervention control condition. Despite families' multiple risk factors, high rates of attendance and satisfaction were achieved. Relative to controls, intervention parents were observed to be significantly more responsive and use more positive parenting practices. Results support the feasibility of engaging high-risk families in an intensive prevention program. The meaningful changes achieved in parenting suggest that a preventive approach is promising for families with multiple risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-257
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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