Previously incarcerated individuals with psychotic symptoms are more likely to report a history of solitary confinement

Arthur T. Ryan, Jordan DeVylder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined whether previously incarcerated individuals with self-reported psychotic symptoms were more likely to endorse a history of solitary confinement. A community-based sample of 176 previously incarcerated individuals residing in Baltimore or New York City were surveyed on prison experiences and mental health symptoms. Logistic regression found that previously incarcerated individuals who endorsed a schizophrenia diagnosis or past 12-month psychotic symptoms were significantly more likely to report a history of solitary confinement while incarcerated. This finding is consistent with other research suggesting that individuals with psychotic illness are disproportionately subjected to solitary confinement while incarcerated, which has important socio-legal implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number113064
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume290
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Incarceration
  • Psychotic experiences
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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