Pricing Out the Disadvantaged? The Effect of Tuition Deregulation in Texas Public Four-Year Institutions

Stella M. Flores, Justin C. Shepherd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article examines whether tuition deregulation in Texas (in 2003 the state legislature gave tuition-setting authority to institutional governing boards) has affected the college enrollment of underrepresented and low-income students. Using a difference-in-differences research design, we find that Hispanic students have been most negatively affected by tuition deregulation. Results for black students are largely mixed, in that we find an increase in college enrollment after deregulation in some specifications, while Pell Grant recipients, incoming and returning, appear to have experienced an increase in college enrollment following deregulation. Implications and recommendations for state governments considering this contentious legislation are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-122
Number of pages24
JournalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume655
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Keywords

  • college access
  • ethnicity
  • financial aid
  • low-income students
  • race
  • tuition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

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