Professional posttraumatic growth after a shared traumatic experience: Manhattan clinicians' perspectives on post-9/11 practice

Jennifer Bauwens, Carol Tosone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Clinicians who live and work in natural and man-made disaster-prone areas are often exposed to trauma primarily as citizens and secondarily as a result of their professional practice. In an attempt to better understand this increasingly common experience of collective trauma, this study explored the long-term impact of September 11 on the professional lives of 201 Manhattan clinicians. Participants reported that 9=11 was the impetus for enhancing self-care, changing clinical modality, and forging new skills. Positive changes were also reported within the therapeutic relationship, including increased compassion and connectedness with clients. Negative effects included feeling ill-equipped to work in the gravity of 9=11, an increased sense of vulnerability, and disappointment with professional organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)498-517
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Loss and Trauma
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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