Promoting Low-Income Preschoolers' Vocabulary Learning From Educational Media: Does Repetition Support Memory for Learned Word Knowledge?

Preeti G. Samudra, Kevin M. Wong, Susan B. Neuman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Children from diverse backgrounds are able to learn new words from educational media. However, learning is often partial and fragile, leaving much room for uncovering strategies that can increase the efficacy of educational media in supporting children's vocabulary knowledge. The present study investigated one such strategy—repeated viewing of educational media—in a sample of low-income preschoolers. One hundred thirty one preschoolers were randomly assigned to view an educational media clip teaching three vocabulary words in one of three conditions: (a) once, (b) three times in immediate succession (massed repetition), or (c) three times with views spaced 1 hour apart (spaced repetition). Children completed a target vocabulary assessment both immediately after the final view and 1 week later. Results indicate that certain types of word knowledge were supported by repetition, particularly spaced repetition. Children also effectively retained the vocabulary knowledge they acquired from educational media over a 1-week period in all conditions. This suggests that educational media is a strong platform for teaching low-income preschoolers new words, and that spaced repetition might further support low-income preschoolers' vocabulary learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)160-173
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Cognitive Education and Psychology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Keywords

  • educational media
  • memory
  • repeated viewing
  • spacing effect
  • vocabulary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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