PSORALEN‐MEDIATED VIRUS PHOTOINACTIVATION IN PLATELET CONCENTRATES: ENHANCED SPECIFICITY OF VIRUS KILL IN THE ABSENCE OF SHORTER UVA WAVELENGTHS

Henrietta Margolis‐Nunno, Richard Robinson, Bernard Horowitz, Nicholas E. Geacintov, Ehud Ben‐Hur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Abstract— Treatments with psoralens and long‐wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320–400 nm; PUVA) have shown efficacy for virus sterilization of platelet concentrates (PC). Our laboratory has employed the psoralen derivative 4'‐aminomethyl‐4, 5', 8‐trimethylpsoralen (AMT), and we have found that platelet integrity is best preserved when rutin, a flavonoid that quenches multiple reactive oxygen species, is present during AMT/UVA treatment of PC. In this report, we examine the effects of different UVA spectra under our standard PC treatment conditions (i.e. 50 μg/mL AMT, 0.35 mM rutin and 38 J/cm2 UVA). Added vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV; ≥5.5 log10) was completely inactivated with the simultaneous maintenance of the platelet aggregation response (>90% of control) when a UVA light source with transmission mainly between 360 and 370 nm (narrow UVA1) was used. In contrast, with a broad‐band UVA (320–400 nm; broad UVA) light source, the aggregation response was greatly compromised (<50% of control) with only a minor increase in the rate of VSV kill. With this lamp, platelet function could be improved to about 75% of the control by adding a long‐pass filter, which reduced the transmission of shorter (≤345 nm) UVA wavelengths (340–400 nm; UVA1). At equivalent levels of virus kill, aggregation function was always best preserved when narrow UVA1 was used for PUVA treatment. Even in the absence of AMT, and with or without rutin present, narrow UVA 1 irradiation was better tolerated by platelets than was broad UVA. Our results suggest that for PUVA treatment of PC, the UVA dose range in which complete virus kill is obtained with the simultaneous maintenance of in vitro platelet function is smallest with broad UVA irradiation and largest with narrow UVA1. Thus, the virus specificity of PC treatment with AMT, UVA and quenchers can be further enhanced by the exclusion of the shorter UVA wavelength range.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-922
Number of pages6
JournalPhotochemistry and photobiology
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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