Psychiatric symptom typology in a sample of youth receiving substance abuse treatment services: Associations with self-reported child maltreatment and sexual risk behaviors

Assaf Oshri, Jonathan G. Tubman, James Jaccard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to classify 394 adolescents undergoing substance use treatment, based on past year psychiatric symptoms. Relations between profile membership and (a) self-reported childhood maltreatment experiences and (b) current sexual risk behavior were examined. LPA generated three psychiatric symptom profiles: Low-, High- Alcohol-, and High- Internalizing Symptoms profiles. Analyses identified significant associations between profile membership and childhood sexual abuse and emotional neglect ratings, as well as co-occurring sex with substance use and unprotected intercourse. Profiles with elevated psychiatric symptom scores (e.g., internalizing problems, alcohol abuse and dependence symptoms) and more severe maltreatment histories reported higher scores for behavioral risk factors for HIV/STI exposure. Heterogeneity in psychiatric symptom patterns among youth receiving substance use treatment services, and prior histories of childhood maltreatment, have significant implications for the design and delivery of HIV/STI prevention programs to this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1844-1856
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • Adolescent risk
  • Child maltreatment
  • HIV
  • Neglect
  • Person-centered
  • Psychiatric disorders
  • Sexual abuse
  • Sexual risk behavior
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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