Psychosocial mediators of the relationship between race/ethnicity and depressive symptoms in latino and white patients with coronary artery disease

Carla Boutin-Foster, G. Ogedegbe, J. Peterson, W. M. Briggs, J. P. Allegrante, M. E. Charlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The high prevalence of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease has been well documented. However, little is known about the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms in Latino patients with coronary artery disease. Purpose: Among Latino and white patients who had percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA), this study examined whether differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms exist and the degree to which psychosocial factors (years of education, employment status, stressful life events, emotional social support) explained any differences. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, closed-format questionnaires were used to obtain clinical and psychosocial history. The definition of high depressive symptoms was based on a score of ≥16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Results: Compared to whites (n=492), Latinos (n=59) were younger, and a greater proportion were female, but fewer completed high school and fewer were employed (P<0.05). More Latinos reported experiencing ≥2 recent stressful life events, but fewer reported having emotional social support (P<0.05). There was a significant association between race/ethnicity and depressive symptoms (OR=2.3, 95% CI: 1.3-4.5). In multivariate analyses, the significance of this association diminished when psychosocial variables were added to the model. Conclusions: In this study, education, employment, stressful life events and emotional social support partially explained the observed racial/ethnic differences in depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)849-855
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume100
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Depression
  • Latinos
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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