Race and Unemployment: Labor Market Experiences of Black and White Men, 1968-1988

Franklin D. Wilson, Lawrence Wu, Marta Tienda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article addresses two questions: First, why is Black unemployment persistently higher than White unemployment? Second, how can this fact be reconciled with narrowing Black/White differentials in educational attainment, occupational position, and earnings? We show that the persistent racial gap in unemployment is due to differential access to employment opportunities by region, occupational placement, labor market segmentation by race, and labor market discrimination. Our findings showing that the racial gap in unemployment is greatest for college-educated men and are consistent with the view that Blacks still encounter barriers to employment in the labor market.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-270
Number of pages26
JournalWork and Occupations
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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