Racial differences in the association of insulin-like growth factor pathway and colorectal adenoma risk

Heather M. Ochs-Balcom, Caila B. Vaughn, Jing Nie, Zhengyi Chen, Cheryl L. Thompson, Niyati Parekh, Russell Tracy, Li Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Insulin resistance is believed to play an important role in the link between energy imbalance and colon carcinogenesis. Emerging evidence suggests that there are substantial racial differences in genetic and anthropometric influences on insulin-like growth factors (IGFs); however, few studies have examined racial differences in the associations of IGFs and colorectal adenoma, precursor lesions of colon cancer. Methods: We examined the association of circulating levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-1, and SNPs in the IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R), IGF-2 receptor (IGF2R), and insulin receptor genes with risk of adenomas in a sample of 410 incident adenoma cases and 1,070 controls from the Case Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Colon Adenomas Study. Results: Caucasians have higher IGF-1 levels compared to African Americans; mean IGF-1 levels are 119.0 ng/ml (SD = 40.7) and 109.8 ng/ml (SD = 40.8), respectively, among cases (p = 0.02). Mean IGF-1 levels are also higher in Caucasian controls (122.9 ng/ml, SD = 41.2) versus African American controls (106.9, SD = 41.2), p = 0.001. We observed similar differences in IGFBP3 levels by race. Logistic regression models revealed a statistically significant association of IGF-1 with colorectal adenoma in African Americans only, with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of 1.68 (95 % CI 1.06-2.68) and 1.68 (95 % CI 1.05-2.71), respectively, for the second and third tertiles as compared to the first tertile. One SNP (rs496601) in IGF1R was associated with adenomas in Caucasians only; the per allele adjusted OR is 0.73 (95 % CI 0.57-0.93). Similarly, one IGF2R SNP (rs3777404) was statistically significant in Caucasians; adjusted per allele OR is 1.53 (95 % CI 1.10-2.14). Conclusion: Our results suggest racial differences in the associations of IGF pathway biomarkers and inherited genetic variance in the IGF pathway with risk of adenomas that warrant further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-170
Number of pages10
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • African American
  • Candidate gene
  • Colorectal adenoma
  • Insulin-like growth factor
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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