Racial discrimination, John Henryism coping, and behavioral health conditions among predominantly poor, urban African Americans: Implications for community-level opioid problems and mental health services

Shawn C.T. Jones, Jennifer H. Brooks, Adam J. Milam, Clara B. Barajas, Thomas A. LaVeist, Erika Kane, C. Debra M. Furr-Holden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study examined the relationship between John Henryism Active Coping (JHAC), experiences of racial discrimination, and behavioral health outcomes in a community sample of 319 Black adults. Assessments included primary health care screenings as well as self-reported survey questions to assess JHAC, experiences of discrimination, and self-reported behavioral health. Logistic regression models, adjusted for control variables, found a significant relationship between JHAC and having an opioid problem (odds ratio [OR] = 0.95, p = 0.003) and needing mental health services (OR = 0.95, p < 0.001), such that higher levels of coping were associated with lower odds of reporting an opioid problem and needing mental health services. Notably, racial discrimination was not significantly independently associated with behavioral health. Implications for interventions and community programming are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1032-1042
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • coping
  • discrimination
  • John Henryism
  • mental health services
  • opioids
  • racism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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