Recruiting drug using men who have sex with men in behavioral intervention trials: A comparison of internet and field-based strategies

Jeffrey T. Parsons, Andrea C. Vial, Tyrel J. Starks, Sarit A. Golub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although online and field-based samples of men who have sex with men (MSM) have been compared on a variety of markers, differences in drug use have not been well examined. In addition, generalization from studies comparing recruitment methods is often limited by a focus on either HIV seropositive or seronegative MSM. We compared two New York City-based samples of MSM recruited simultaneously between July 2009 and January 2010 - one sample recruited in the field (n = 2,402) and one sample recruited via the Internet (n = 694). All recruitment efforts targeted men without restriction on age or self-reported HIV status. Our results show marked differences in drug and alcohol use between online and field-based samples of MSM. Specifically, men surveyed online were significantly more likely to have tried a variety of drugs, including methamphetamine, cocaine, and ecstasy. Men recruited online were also more likely to report older age, HIV positive serostatus, and "never" using condoms. Internet-based recruitment was found to be more cost-effective in terms of recruitment yield than was field-based recruitment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-699
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Field
  • Internet
  • MSM
  • Recruitment
  • Stimulants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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