Relating effortful control, executive function, and false belief understanding to emerging math and literacy ability in kindergarten

Clancy Blair, Rachel Peters Razza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined the role of self-regulation in emerging academic ability in one hundred and forty-one 3- to 5-year-old children from low-income homes. Measures of effortful control, false belief understanding, and the inhibitory control and attention-shifting aspects of executive function in preschool were related to measures of math and literacy ability in kindergarten. Results indicated that the various aspects of child self-regulation accounted for unique variance in the academic outcomes independent of general intelligence and that the inhibitory control aspect of executive function was a prominent correlate of both early math and reading ability. Findings suggest that curricula designed to improve self-regulation skills as well as enhance early academic abilities may be most effective in helping children succeed in school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-663
Number of pages17
JournalChild development
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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