Relationship between drug abuse and intimate partner violence: A longitudinal study among women receiving methadone

Nabila El-Bassel, Louisa Gilbert, Elwin Wu, Hyun Go, Jennifer Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We examined whether frequent drug use increases the likelihood of subsequent sexual or physical intimate partner violence (IPV) and whether IPV increases the likelihood of subsequent frequent drug use. Methods. A random sample of 416 women on methadone was assessed at baseline (wave 1) and at 6 months (wave 2), and 12 months (wave 3) following the initial assessment. Propensity score matching and multiple logistic regression were employed. Results. Women who reported frequent crack use at wave 2 were more likely than non-drug using women to report IPV at wave 3 (odds ratio [OR] = 4.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1, 9.1; P < .01), and frequent marijuana users at wave 2 were more likely than non-drug users to report IPV at wave 3 (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 2.4, 8.4; P < .01). In addition, women who reported IPV at wave 2 were more likely than women who did not report IPV to indicate frequent heroin use at wave 3 (OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.1, 6.5; P = .04). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the relationship between frequent drug use and IPV is bidirectional and varies by type of drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)465-470
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume95
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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