Relationship between retail food outlets near public schools and adolescent obesity in New York City

Pasquale E. Rummo, Erilia Wu, Zachary T. McDermott, Robert F. Wagner, Amy Ellen Schwartz, Brian Elbel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using objectively-measured height and weight data from academic years 2009–2013 (n = 1,114,010 student-year observations), we estimated the association between the food outlet in closest proximity to schools and the likelihood of obesity among New York City public high school students. Obesity risk was higher for students with a corner store as the nearest option to schools, regardless of whether other food outlet types were located within a quarter mile or a half mile of schools (i.e., benchmarks for zoning policies). Policymakers may want to consider introducing healthier food options near schools, in conjunction with programs to support changes within corner stores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102408
JournalHealth and Place
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Body mass index
  • Corner stores
  • Fast food restaurants
  • Food environment
  • Food policy
  • Obesity
  • Schools
  • Supermarkets
  • Zoning laws

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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