Reversing the Marginalization of Global Environmental Politics in International Relations: An Opportunity for the Discipline

Jessica F. Green, Thomas N. Hale

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Despite the increasing urgency of many environmental problems, environmental politics remains at the margins of the discipline. Using data from the Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) project, this article identifies a puzzle: The majority of international relations (IR) scholars find climate change among the top three most important policy issues today, yet fewer than 4% identify the environment as their primary area of research. Moreover, environmental research is rarely published in top IR journals, although there has been a recent surge in work focused on climate change. The authors argue that greater attention to environmental issues-including those beyond climate change-in IR can bring significant benefits to the discipline, and they discuss three lines of research to correct this imbalance.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)473-479
    Number of pages7
    JournalPS - Political Science and Politics
    Volume50
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Reversing the Marginalization of Global Environmental Politics in International Relations: An Opportunity for the Discipline'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this