Second-generation Holocaust survivors: Psychological, theological, and moral challenges

Samuel Juni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing from trauma theory, psychodynamic conceptualization, developmental psychology, clinical data, and personal experience, this article portrays a life haunted by tragedy predating its victims. Healthy child development is outlined, with particular attention to socialization and theological perspectives. Key characteristics of trauma are delineated, highlighting the nuances of trauma that are most harmful. As is the case with general trauma, Holocaust survivors are described as evincing survivor’s guilt and paranoia in response to their experiences. Divergent disorders resulting from the Holocaust are described for 1st-generation and 2nd-generation survivors, respectively. Primary trauma responses and pervasive attitudes of survivors are shown to have harmful ramifications on their children’s personality and worldview as well as on their interpersonal and theistic object relations. These limitations translate into problems in the adult lives of second generation survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-111
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Trauma and Dissociation
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Keywords

  • Holocaust survivors
  • moral
  • psychological, theological
  • second-generation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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