Seeing and hearing: The impacts of New York City's universal pre-kindergarten program on the health of low-income children

Kai Hong, Kacie Dragan, Sherry Glied

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examine the effect of New York City's universal pre-kindergarten program (UPK) on the health and utilization of children enrolled in Medicaid using a difference-in-regression-discontinuities design. We find that UPK increases the probability that a child is diagnosed with asthma or with vision problems, receives treatment for hearing or vision problems, or receives an immunization or screening during the pre-kindergarten year. These effects are not offset by lower rates in the kindergarten year, suggesting that UPK accelerates the rate at which children are identified with and treated for conditions that could potentially delay learning and cause behavioral problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-107
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume64
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • Health
  • Medicaid
  • Pre-kindergarten
  • Regression discontinuity design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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