Self-efficacy mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and medication adherence among hypertensive African Americans

Antoinette Schoenthaler, Gbenga Ogedegbe, John P. Allegrante

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Many studies have documented the negative effects of depression on adherence to recommended treatment; however, little is known about the mechanism underlying this relationship. Using the Kenny and Baron analytic framework of mediation, the authors assessed whether self-efficacy mediated the relationship between depression and medication adherence in 167 hypertensive African Americans followed in a primary care practice. Depressive symptoms are associated with poor medication adherence (β =.013, p =.036) and low self-efficacy (β = -.008, p =.023). Self-efficacy is negatively associated with medication adherence at follow-up (β = -.612, p <.001). The relationship between depressive symptoms and medication adherence becomes nonsignificant when controlling for self-efficacy (β =.010, p =.087). Implications for further examination into the mediating role of self-efficacy and the deleterious effect of depression on medication adherence are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-137
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Keywords

  • African American
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Hypertension
  • Medication adherence
  • Self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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