Self-reported Hazardous Drinking, Hypertension, and Antihypertensive Treatment Among Hispanic Immigrants in the US National Health Interview Survey, 2016–2018

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Abstract

Compared to the US-born population, Hispanic immigrants are reported to have lower age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension. However, country of origin, race/ethnicity, and risk behaviors associated with acculturation, including hazardous drinking, can affect the prevalence of hypertension. Additionally, health disparities across immigration/nativity status may be associated with suboptimal antihypertensive treatment and control of hypertension. In the present study, population-based data from the years 2016 to 2018 of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed to assess the association of nativity status and hazardous drinking with hypertension among US-born and foreign-born Hispanic populations. Age-adjusted prevalence of past-year hypertension among foreign-born Hispanics was lower than US-born Hispanics. However, the proportion of Hispanic immigrants who had their blood pressure checked by a healthcare professional was also smaller than US-born Hispanics, suggesting that the prevalence of hypertension among Hispanic immigrants may be underreported. Hazardous drinking was associated with decreased odds of antihypertensive treatment among the Hispanic immigrants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Awareness
  • Hazardous drinking
  • Hispanic immigrants
  • Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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